behindstrength:

A Fitness Motivation / Intense Workout Blog  FOLLOW FOR MORE

I’ve been gone for awhile! Busy summer but now I’m (hopefulyl) back to fitness blogging on a semi-permanent basis. Here’s what I’ve been doing!

College summer classes. Ugh.

Today was my last day working for a soccer camp, somehow I didn’t sweat off as much fat in the Texas heat as I felt like I did.

I finished the Spartan race back in May btdubs.

I started Insanity. It’s insane.

I’ve been doing a lot of arms work and I’m noticing slight progressive changes (friggin stubborn muscles).

Summer soccer league. I’ve only been able to play one game so far, thanks to weather and low numbers but whattdya gonnna do.

I’ve been crazy busy with a short film that I wrote, produced and directed. As well as just writing. I’ve been taking improv classes as well.

Every summer I commit to making changes and I don’t necessarily see progress. Here’s to noticeable differences come back to school.

“I began to realize how important it was to be an enthusiast in life. If you are interested in something, no matter what it is, go at it full speed ahead. Embrace it with both arms, hug it, love it and above all become passionate about it. Lukewarm is no good.”

Roald Dahl   (via fuckinq)

Life fricking motto.

(via kyrafic)

(via theperksofrunning)

afootballobserver:

Brazil 1-7 Germany [WC 2014 SF] 08/07/2014

André Schürrle 79’ (Assist: Thomas Müller)

afootballobserver:

Brazil 1-7 Germany [WC 2014 SF] 08/07/2014

André Schürrle 79’ (Assist: Thomas Müller)


Ella Masar during Houston Dash vs Chicago Red Stars

Ella Masar during Houston Dash vs Chicago Red Stars

Ella Masar during Houston Dash vs Chicago Red Stars

Ella Masar during Houston Dash vs Chicago Red Stars

Ella Masar during Houston Dash vs Chicago Red Stars

Ella Masar during Houston Dash vs Chicago Red Stars

Ella Masar during Houston Dash vs Chicago Red Stars

(via houstondashing)

glovesinthesummertime:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

KNOW YOUR HISTORY: Memorial Day was started by former slaves on May, 1, 1865 in Charleston, SC to honor 257 dead Union Soldiers who had been buried in a mass grave in a Confederate prison camp. They dug up the bodies and worked for 2 weeks to give them a proper burial as gratitude for fighting for their freedom. They then held a parade of 10,000 people led by 2,800 Black children where they marched, sang and celebrated.

Thanks to Abstrakt Goldsmith for this nugget of history that most of us never learned in school.

Via The Blue Street Journal

Now this is information I like to see on Memorial Day.

(via apafro)